Guardian on wildlife…

Harrowing stats, all down. An open window at night might bring in a moth, 25yrs ago there would be lots and you would make sure it was only slightly ajar at night for eight months of the year. Even toads the Guardian tells us are at two thirds down in the 30 years I’ve been visiting the pit heap, funnily enough these last few years toads have been far fewer, water is fed in at a dribble from ag land further up, I wonder if and what they are spraying?

As cited previously its difficult to find up to date news of moth decline. Silence too on Pacific seabird decline and next to nothing on my favourite topic of diatoms – a strata of base level food chain that all successive levels depend upon.

I think municipal authorities could do more, excessive verge clearing must surely not help, though I do realise sapling encroachment may be part of their remit. Our local park is poorly managed say for unhindered sapling ash sprouting out of everything yet still there is the needless strimming at mid summer of any marginal herbage. So what about campion, yellow rattle or suchlike being able to set and scatter seed? Or my pending one thousand orchids scattered as seed a couple of years ago, the repeat of an experiment conducted sucessfully elsewhere. This tells me they know zilch for butterfly conservation. Also old and dead timber is not allowed to remain, hence are adamant on minimising food supply for songbirds.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/may/31/herbicides-insecticides-save-british-countryside-meaows

 

P1110800
Tiny toad found on the road. say 2011

 

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