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A valuable link …

… re climate change, arctic ice loss and ice thinning.

Arctic sea ice’s dramatic transformation revealed through 42 years of satellite data – ABC News

You have to realise thinning can occur from underside as well as from the top. The former I’m guessing will be the downfall of the Antarctic ice shelves as they are levered away from the parent body, its a different set-up down south so to speak.

The action is in the Arctic as we read in the above, the highest and lowest extremes in Siberia at one same location has now set new records and sat imagery shows the depletion and the near non-existance of multi-year ice. You can add my tears to the ever increasing sea level.

Arctic News (arctic-news.blogspot.com) is also a valuable read. Locations such as the shallow Laptev Sea are forever burnt into my mind. I’ve a £1k wager with friend Gary who is a little sceptical of the severity of my forecast that if we have not reached 3deg C or above by end of 2026 then I will hand him £1k cash, no quibble. I don’t want it to be so but we must all realise the severity of what is happening with multiple feedback loops, all self and mutually reinforcing to greater and higher levels, its a lethal chemistry set we should never have set in motion, as if all the ingredients are present and its one big joke to see how we exploit, extract and set in motion the inevitable. If only we could have lived as in a Biblical simplicity.

There are so many factors and components and values feeding into the active equation that is planetary science, remember our space on this spinning ball of eight inches diameter scales at one thousandth of an inch ie 0.001in equivilant to a cigarette paper licked and placed on a childs eight inch toy ball.

There is nothing we do re carbon emission that will take any effect inside of a decade, the latest scares and truths in fact are many, loss of the aerosol masking effect, arctic methane, loss of high altitude cloud cover, and my own pet hobby horse of (near never reported) of the loss of the oceanic plankton particularly diatoms, quite ironic as it is ancient diatoms that form the basis for 70% of the worlds oil and gas supplies.

Arch clown, otherwise now realised to be a ‘stand-up president’ as in comedian namely trump should be tried at The Hague for his four year climate denial, this is a crime against humanity, four valuable years lost.

What would help is a universal one child policy, a move from the American burger culture, to live close to work and abandon your car in whatever form it takes petrol or electric, none of them are particularly green. Everything starts and rests with the individual, I deliberately have hand washed my laundry for the last couple of years, its no problem to me as luckily I have a clean job, here in north east England works fine, a quick wring and the washing line does the rest, none of the endless tumbling and spinning of the electrical machine.

Theres approx five hundred posts on this paid for blog, please explore.

copyright climate-change-briefing 2021

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nooks and crannies …

… these are the things we have lost that insects, bees and butterflies crave as their winter locations, our slick modernity offers them nothing. No tree is allowed to weather and decay as nature intended, offering a multitude of opportunities for new insects and molds and organisms to appear on the altered now declining tree, a home for bats perhaps; a tree or at least some trees surely must be allowed to follow its natural cycle that can offer a new feast and home to so many living things. In the liability culture and ‘tidy’ malaise that seems to be taken up by everyone from municipal gardeners to householders all must be cut down, levelled and rendered sterile, all trees young, exemplified by the dreaded ‘rowan’ of municipal planting. Likewise our habitations and structures offer next to nothing for the tinier members of the natural world.

So what do I do to counter this ignorance of ecology, this ignorance of the living world? I allow things to decline and rot, I create jumbles of prunings in quiet areas of my garden, I stack same length cut limbs and branches from small trees say eighteen or twenty four inches long topped with roofing felt and a couple of bricks at many places at the perimeter of my garden. I allow bees to take over the various nest boxes if they so wish, which reminds me I’d better get another birdbox made and installed this weekend.

Each autumn I often can find say six nests dotted around this medium size semi-urban garden and also know each nest box generally produces two clutches a year; my garden is alive with the sound of garden songbirds, all it needs is common sense and to read a little to pick up the basics, all gardens should be like mine! But how many people nowadays enjoy the contents of an instructional or non-fiction book, especially kids, so much lost!

A great thrill a few years ago was seeing the queen bee fly in her flightless workers one by one piggy back into the commandeered dry and waterproof birdbox I’d made myself, theres lots of thing I make myself, its my particular mindset and approach to life, its the way I was brought up.

For bee and insect and butterfly overwintering I sometimes wrap up bundles of umbellifer stems with string and place them in unvisited parts of wherever. I specifically allow leaf litter to remain, essential for healthy worms and soil, the latter being much more complex and beautiful than most people realise, likewise the blackbird for instance craves to turn over a mature long established leaf layer. Daily I feed birds at my own garden and the location for my list below.

A location nearby which was once a pit heap wsaste ie spoil heap, then a waste infill site is now reclaimed and wooded and since moving here thirty years ago I’ve introduced two dozen native north British species over the last twenty years plus, at 7th May 2021, this is all done to help insects and therefore bird life.

  • honeysuckle
  • foxglove (wild collected seed)
  • bluebells
  • teasel (from an old pit site a mile away)
  • common spotted orchid (from a nearby pit yard two miles away)
  • round leaved orchid (from motorway services)
  • cranesbill
  • avens (geum) from Beacon Hill (now being much over-exploited by greedy holiday lets)
  • red campion (silene) from Wooler
  • cowslip (from the motorway verge at the Seaham turn-off, relevant to my wife Christine)
  • primrose
  • dog violet
  • ragged robin
  • cow parsley
  • pignut
  • angelica
  • wild carrot
  • milk parsley
  • unwittingly … thatching reed
  • yellow flag iris ( lots and as botanists say ‘successful’)
  • common polypody (ie a common fern, at the stonework of the outfall, my wifes ashes etc)
  • round leaved mint
  • sweet chestnut from seed (failed, too much shade)
  • wood sorrel (failed, I think doomed to failure anyway)
  • goatsbeard … now gone due to overzealous cutting of verges, lets collect more seed this summer etc
  • snowdrop seed five years ago and waiting
  • blue whelted thistle
  • knapweed (very useful for hoverflies)
  • marsh marigold – latest addition May 2021 – I’m sure will thrive.
  • enchanters nightshade
  • my wifes ashes

So far a list of thirty items!

And I’m sure theres more but cannot recall; each of the above would be a deliberate effort with wild collected material. I shall try again with the round leaved mint, I know of a roadside location where I can obtain complete rooted material, its wonderful for bees, as is the glorious, valuable and much unappreciated knapweed. Likewise I need to get back over to the donor pit yard for the common spotted, ten years ago I had hundreds and now much dwindled to a couple of dozen. I would have thought the reclaimed / disturbed land would suit them.

All done by me and cost nowt …. no app no screen no signal !!! Its what my Dad would call ‘good with his hands’.

copyright climate-change-briefing.com 2021

Why no wasps?

Summer 2020 has shown few wasps in this garden, even with a plum tree full of fruit, ie north east England. Its no use asking anyone, there will always be someone that has a wasps nest somewhere in their garden and so hence to them there is no decline. I never knew I would lament the lack of wasps.

Anyway, heres a link below to the stark and obvious fact of insect decline.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2020/05/where-have-all-the-insects-gone-feature/

I also wonder if theres a similar decline to the inhabitants at soil level and beneath, these being utterly vital to soil health and fertility. What a web we have weaved with our endless desire to be modern progressive and productive. I’m seeing far fewer in fact hardly any owls this year 2020 and fear birdsong has diminished; I’m a country lover and have spent many decades enjoying nature, I’ve a little bit of an idea what I’m talking about. My own garden has been described as a haven, including its variety and general jumble of intersting perennials, I garden deliberately to create locations for insects, small mammals and those desiring to over-winter safely or at least with a chance of survival. My neighbours are hopeless. No longer can we see open work dry stone walls in our semi or urban environment, all the nooks and crannies have been eradicated either by excessive modern design (housing and environment) and the eradication altogether of a nature friendly environment by means of concrete, paving, gravel or tarmac. Just to set seal with the modern onslaught on living things, that insects and invertebrates cannot survive the Local Authority (Council – call it what you will)… zealously spray weedkiller at the base of any and all fenceposts, telegraph poles, margins of concrete and tarmac, all are a valuable niche habitat. Out local ‘nature reserve’ / pit heap now has total width mowed access tracks where once wormwood, snapdragon and various umbellifers, wild carrot etc thrived. Now, I do not see any bees, diptera, butterflies, hoverflies etc.

Progress !

I am afraid I do not share David Attenboroughs optimism.

On the brighter side I’ve now turned my microscope toward the tiny gnats and midges that end up on my windowsills, the wonders, complexity and sheer beauty are indeed worth beholding, for instance the irridesence of the wings of a gnat, I so far haven’t tried to identify species, one of the few areas of knowledge I do not have at least one book available somewhere in this house…. NO… I recall I do indeed have at least say five or six atlases or compendiums that may reveal some classification of flying things that only a microscope can fully reveal. Another microscopic revelation is the head of a crane fly ie ‘daddy long legs’ ….. bizzare and fascinating!

Its my personal opinion chemtrail aluminium may play a part in all this insect and invertebrate loss, already we read of alzheimers in bees. Also we need to fast track the too long wait for peer reviewed papers, for the latest data and analysis, for news from experienced hands, we haven’t the time, I’ve said this for years.